Is Third Time The Charm For Louisiana Legislature?

The House and Senate gavel back into session today to restart the lingering tax debate.

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Blues Singer Mable John: Big Plans for her Hometown of Bastrop

Mable John, “Motown’s first singing lady” is a Bastrop, Louisiana native. The eldest of 10 children, she became the first female signed by Berry Gordy to Motown’s Tamla Records. When she was just a baby, her family moved from Log Cabin, Louisiana to Cullendale, Arkansas where her father worked at a paper mill. At the age of 12, Mable moved with the family to Detroit and graduated from high school. John began working at an insurance company managed by Berry Gordy’s mother. Influenced by the...

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These days, sugar is pretty much everywhere in the American diet. A new initiative from the University of California, San Francisco spells out the health dangers of this glut of sugar in clear terms.

For the project, called SugarScience, a team of researchers distilled 8,000 studies and research papers and found strong evidence that overconsumption of added sugar contributes to three major chronic illnesses: heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and liver disease.

Josh Kronberg-Rasner was the only openly gay person in his office while he worked for a food service company in Casper, Wyo. But his sexual orientation never held him back, he says. "I had filled every position from general manager to executive chef," he says. "You name it, I'd done all of it."

That changed in the summer of 2012 when Kronberg-Rasner got a new manager, whom Kronberg-Rasner says was uncomfortable working with a gay person. A few weeks after he arrived, the manager went through Kronberg-Rasner's personal phone and found pictures of a male gymnast.

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Former Army Ranger and Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald took over as secretary of veterans affairs three months ago, while the department was stained by scandal. The VA for years had falsified documents to conceal the delays veterans faced in getting medical care. One audit found that 13 percent of VA schedulers were told to cook the books.

Learning to name the colors is a ritual of childhood. At first kids have no clue; often they'll just say everything is "boo." Pretty soon, though, they can rattle off Roy G. Biv with aplomb. Still, that doesn't mean they understand what color actually is.

Mark Fairchild, who studies color and vision science at the Rochester Institute of Technology, says that even physicists get it wrong when they confidently assert that color is just a wavelength of light.

HealthCare.gov barely worked when it launched last fall, with only six people able to enroll in a plan on opening day.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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President Obama says it's time for the Federal Communications Commission to regulate the Internet as a public utility to keep it free and open.

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Now a rare presidential apology that we can all hear, 31 years later.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARGARET THATCHER: Hello, Margaret Thatcher here.

Critics of America's health care system say it's really a "sick care" system. Doctors and hospitals only get paid for treating people when they're sick.

But that's starting to change. Health insurance companies and big government payers like Medicare are starting to reward doctors and hospitals for keeping people healthy.

So, many health care companies are trying to position themselves as organizations that help people stay well.

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Remembering D.J. Fontana, The Drummer For Elvis Presley's Band

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air . DAVE DAVIES, HOST: This is FRESH AIR. D.J. Fontana, the drummer on some of Elvis Presley's biggest hits like "Blue Suede Shoes," "Hound Dog" and "All Shook Up," died Wednesday in Nashville. He was 87. Fontana was the first drummer in Presley's band and played in it for 14 years on over 450 recordings. He appeared with Elvis during that legendary "Ed Sullivan Show" performance and in the movie "Jailhouse Rock." In 2009, D.J. Fontana was...

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