Arts

Arts and culture

John Adams might be called the "documentarian" among American composers. His works have traced the birth of the atomic bomb, President Nixon's trip to China and the 9-11 attacks. Now, Adams turns to the California Gold Rush.

This month diners in Toronto were treated to a four-course meal at a pop-up restaurant called June's. The menu included Northern Thai leek and potato soup with a hint of curry, a pasta served with smoked arctic char followed by garlic rapini and flank steak. The entire meal was topped off with a boozy tiramisu for dessert.

In addition to a mouthwatering meal, the chefs at June's also served a message which they wore on their shirts: "Break bread. Smash stigma."

The history of Hollywood accurately reflecting Latino culture has been spotty at best, downright racist and insulting at its worst.

So anytime a major studio takes on a Latino theme many of us respond with a raise eyebrow, not exactly waiting with bated breath but certainly a healthy dose of skepticism.

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Earlier this week, we talked with food blogger Deb Perelman from the website Smitten Kitchen, and she gave us her tips for making the best Thanksgiving stuffing. One of her suggestions really stuck with us.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Yesterday on the program we aired our annual Thanksgiving musical chain of gratitude.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M EVERY WOMAN")

CHAKA KHAN: (Singing) I'm every woman. It's all in me.

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Over the past year, we've had some unbelievable artists walk through our studio doors and melt our musical minds. Laura Marling nailed a live vocal performance so perfect you might swear you're hearing a studio mix she'd worked on for weeks rather than a live one-off.

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Ellyn Rucker On Piano Jazz

Nov 24, 2017

Ellyn Rucker's light, sensual vocals and smooth, swinging piano produce a wonderfully intriguing mixture. Hailing from Colorado, Rucker broke into the jazz big leagues in the 1980s after she took up her musical career full-time. She remains a staple on the Denver music scene.

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