Arts

Arts and culture

Warren Zevon On Mountain Stage

20 hours ago

From the Mountain Stage archives: a little-heard performance from gifted singer-songwriter-rocker Warren Zevon, recorded live Nov. 17, 1991, at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va. Zevon was a beloved cult hero in the world of rock music.

When Dee Dee Bridgewater learned that she would become a 2017 NEA Jazz Master, a succession of thoughts and feelings flooded her mind. The news came as a total shock, as she tells it: "It was so far out of my orbit and just my whole sphere of thinking," she said in a conversation at NPR this spring, hours before she formally received her award.

Gorillaz Are Human After All

22 hours ago

A few weeks ago, my husband brought home a bottle of chilled beverage that wasn't on the grocery list I had sent him out with. It was a bottle of pre-packaged sugarcane juice – a novelty in a market flooded with bottled soda and mango drinks. But one sip of the drink and I was transported back to my childhood summers.

'The Radium Girls' Is Haunted By Glowing Ghosts

23 hours ago

In 1888, the match girls of London went on strike.

Their reason was a particularly horrifying working condition: ingesting phosphorus. A girl with "phossy jaw" would literally glow in the dark as her jawbone slowly disintegrated. This strike was a fight for their lives. Against expectations, they won — a watershed for Victorian industrial workers. Later strikers invoked the match girls as inspiration; girls who'd come together so something so dangerous couldn't happen again.

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, the firebrand trumpeter from New Orleans, doesn't go in for small gestures. His current project is The Centennial Trilogy, a three-album series intended to confront a range of societal issues, especially as they relate to the African-American population. The style of this new work carries a no less ambitious agenda, blending aspects of post-bop, trap and electronics, according to the non-idiomatic designation that Adjuah likes to call "Stretch Music."

Algiers Shows Us 'The Underside Of Power'

23 hours ago

"I heard someone say once that you don't know what real power is until you're on the wrong side of it," Algiers' frontman, Franklin James Fisher tells NPR. The concept underpins Algiers' newest record and its title track, "The Underside of Power," the video for which we're premiering today.

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