Politics & Government

Political news and news about government; who runs it and how it works.

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I'm Audie Cornish in Washington where Republicans were not able to rally enough of their own members to vote for a replacement to the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare.

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The Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist movement that has long held a disputed position in Middle Eastern politics, is now a focus of controversy in the United States.

Known in Arabic as the Ikhwan and founded nearly a century ago in Egypt, it advocates the application of Islamic principles in public life. The movement has so far pushed that agenda only in Muslim-majority countries, but some critics now claim — without evidence — that it is doing the same in the United States.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

House Republicans scrapped a vote on their health care replacement plan on Friday after defections from both the right and center that made it clear the bill would not pass.

"Obamacare is the law of the land. It is going to remain the law of the land," House Speaker Paul Ryan admitted shortly after he pulled the bill. "We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future. I don't know how long it's going to take us to replace this law."

It's a love story for the ages: a boy, a girl and more than a million bugs.

Lois and Charlie O'Brien, two octogenarian entomologists, have spent their life together chasing insects around the world — some 60 years of romance and field work. Now the married scientists are donating their vast insect collection to Arizona State University.

North Dakota's Republican governor signed legislation Thursday night that allows people to carry concealed handguns without needing a permit.

This makes North Dakota the latest of about a dozen states to adopt what gun rights proponents often call "constitutional carry," according to the National Rifle Association.

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