Politics & Government

Political news and news about government; who runs it and how it works.

Sometimes, it's the Internet of stings.

Juicero, a startup that sells a pricey juice press, found that out firsthand. The company's Wi-Fi-enabled machine produces cold-pressed juice out of packets sold exclusively to owners via subscription.

Verizon reported this week that it has lost nearly 300,000 cell phone subscribers in the first three months of the year.

Verizon is the country’s largest wireless provider, but it is facing increased competition from smaller carriers like T-Mobile that are expanding their services.

Comedy Series 'Girlboss' Hits Netflix Today

Apr 21, 2017

“Girlboss,” a new comedy series, is streaming on Netflix on Friday. The show is inspired by the memoir of the same name by American businesswoman Sophia Amoruso, the founder of the women’s clothing retailer Nasty Gal.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) about the show.

A new study has found an association between frequent drinking of diet sodas and an increased risk of both stroke and dementia.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Dr. Matthew Pase, the study’s lead author and a neurologist at the Boston University School of Medicine, about what it means for the average soda drinker.

Where does a foodie find food on the road? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst drove from coast to coast on her way back to her home in New England, and discovered lots of great restaurants along the way. She shares some of her finds with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. You can also check out Kathy’s Instagram for more photos from the trip.

Becky G From the Block

Apr 21, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Are Immigrants Good or Bad for the Economy?

Apr 21, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Denison, Iowa. Population: Lots of Latinos

Apr 21, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When U.S. intelligence agencies spy on Americans, they're supposed to get a warrant. But what happens when they're spying on a foreigner and an American calls up?

The way intelligence agencies handle what they call this "incidental" collection of information — and what political leaders eventually do with it — will be a big part of the next phase in Congress' investigations about the Russian interference in last year's presidential election.

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