Associated Press

The government has delayed for at least 90 days the disposal of artillery propellant at Camp Minden.

The Times reports (http://bit.ly/1E7mPEI ) the decision was released in a letter from Samuel Coleman, deputy regional administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, to Louisiana officials.

Coleman says in the letter that the delay will help "remove any barriers to the state selecting an equal or more protective remedy at Camp Minden."

Derek Bridges / Flickr.com

  U.S. Sen. David Vitter says if he's elected governor this fall, he'd immediately call a special legislative session to address Louisiana's ongoing budget problems.

The session, according to Thursday's announcement, would focus on: removing budget protections that leave public colleges and health services more vulnerable to cuts, reviewing tax breaks to determine if they benefit the state and cutting other tax rates.

No specifics were given about the tax proposals.

Industrial Development Board for the city of New Orleans has approved tax breaks worth at least $3.1 million for a proposed $63.5 million movie studio complex.

If completed, the Deep South Studios complex would be one of the biggest investments in the local film industry to date.

elycefeliz / Flickr.com

  After pleas from Monroe city workers for the administration to reward them for their hard work, the city council has approved two items aimed at starting a conversation on an increase in the minimum wage for city employees.

The News-Star reports (http://tnsne.ws/1wZIYzT ) the two items are a resolution stating the city council supports an increase in the minimum wage to $10 an hour and the approval of a study that will compare pay scales and job descriptions of Monroe to similarly situated cities.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu welcomed a new class of police recruits and praised them for taking the challenge to don a police badge in one of the nation's most crime-plagued cities.

The new class begins its 10 months of training as crime spikes in the French Quarter and the New Orleans Police Department struggles with a shortage of officers on the streets.

Landrieu spoke to the 30 recruits today at the start of their first day of tough physical training at a training facility in eastern New Orleans.

Elton John, The Who, Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga will headline this year's New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.

The festival annually draws hundreds of thousands to New Orleans for two weekends of jazz, blues, Cajun, zydeco and gospel. The lineup draws heavily from Louisiana but it's accented with national acts. This year they will also include No Doubt, Keith Urban, Pitbull, John Legend, Ed Sheeran and Chicago.

Strawberry farmers are bracing for Wednesday night's cold snap.

WBRZ-TV reports that crews worked to cover their strawberries and protect them from the cold weather moving in.

Farmers say if temperatures get too cold and stay there for too long, they could be facing a total loss of their crops.

Lows are forecast to be around 20 degrees in southern Louisiana and stay in the 20s for the next two or three days, with the potential for freezing rain later in the week.

Neighborhood groups came out strongly on Tuesday against a massive overhaul of the codes governing new development in New Orleans, setting the stage for fights over new condominiums along the Mississippi River, the spread of live music into quiet neighborhoods and the delicate balance between economic growth and residents' wishes.

The groups paid for a new billboard near City Hall calling on city leaders to "Fix the CZO!," a reference to the new 600-plus page comprehensive zoning ordinance under review. The City Council is expected to adopt the new codes this year.

Tales of the fire that devastated Lake Charles in 1919, and other historical information and ghost stories all are part of a free new smartphone app about the city's Charpentier Historic District.

Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau spokeswoman Angie Manning said the app offers half-hour and one-hour tours. Manning says it explains that the area's Victorian homes reflect the personalities of the carpenters who built them. The city did not have any architects until the 1900s.

The Biloxi City Council is considering an ordinance, based on a similar ordinance used in New Orleans, that would protect people riding on floats and marching in parades from throw-backs by spectators.

The Sun Herald reports a first reading of an ordinance came Tuesday without comment. Council President Kenny Glavan later said that he's had a couple of krewes ask for the protection.

The ordinance says people sometimes throw beads and other items back on the floats where participants are occupied, potentially injuring them.

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