Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multi-media producer living in New Orleans. She began her career in New Orleans as an Assistant Design Producer for the production company Rehage Entertainment, and went on to work with the local online news and culture publication NOLADefender, where she served as Assistant Publisher for two years. Then, from June 2012 to October 2013, she worked as a producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity.

Laine is now a station producer at WWNO, the managing editor of Nolavie.com, producer of the Moth Storyslam, and runs her own live storytelling event called Bring Your Own.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a retrospective look at Mardi Gras, and the year that carnival took place in the dark. Hear the TriPod Xtras extended interview with Rien Fertel. 

Right now, you might not be itching for Mardi Gras, since it just happened and everything, but imagine what it will feel like six months from now when you haven’t caught any beads, or a shoe, or a light up clicky thing, and still have another six months to go. It can be rough.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history, and an attempt at reconciliation. Listen to Part I here

We left off at the Sold South Panel that took place in New Orleans in December of 2016. The discussion centered around something Georgetown University did in 1838 when the institution sold 272 enslaved people to two plantations in Louisiana to avoid bankruptcy.

TriPod: New Orleans @300 returns with the first in a two-part series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history. In 1838, Jesuits from Georgetown University sold 272 people to Louisiana.

Tripod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part II of its series on Camp Algiers, an internment camp that detained Latin Americans during World War II. Listen to Part I here.

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part I of a two-part series about a World War II era internment camp in Algiers that held those suspicious of affiliations with axis powers. Listen to Part II here

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 brings us another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with 92 year old Architect Al Ledner. Ledner graduated from the Tulane School of Architecture, and briefly left his hometown of New Orleans to study with Frank Lloyd Wright. He has buildings all around the country, and is known in New Orleans for the homes he built on Park Island in Bayou St. John, including the Cointreau home.

This is to a special edition of TriPod New Orleans @300. Producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson handed the mic over to the New Orleans Scholars, a group of students from Metairie Park Country Day and Benjamin Franklin High Schools. Each semester they collaborate with a community group to explore a local challenge: economic, environmental, political and historical.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a portrait of Mother Catherine Seals, one of the city’s most prominent 20th century spiritual church leaders.

Mother Catherine Seals is a mysterious figure. There’s not much written about her, and there are only a few photographs of her. So a lot of what we do know about this spiritual mother is hearsay.

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with a story of The Sisters of the Holy Family, the religious order of nuns for free women of color founded by Henriette Delille before the Civil War. They’re still ministering today.

Driving along Chef Menteur Highway out in New Orleans East, you pass your fair share of fast food joints, RV parks, and Super 8 motels. And then, a huge Nativity scene on a big mid-century building. It’s the motherhouse of the Sisters of the Holy Family.

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