Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multi-media producer living in New Orleans. She began her career in New Orleans as an Assistant Design Producer for the production company Rehage Entertainment, and went on to work with the local online news and culture publication NOLADefender, where she served as Assistant Publisher for two years. Then, from June 2012 to October 2013, she worked as a producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity.

Laine is now a station producer at WWNO, the managing editor of Nolavie.com, producer of the Moth Storyslam, and runs her own live storytelling event called Bring Your Own.

Tripod’s NOLA versus Nature series returns with a story of the construction of the Industrial Canal. Host Laine  Kaplan-Levenson looks at the ways this massive infrastructure project was invasive, above and below ground. Hear the Part I on Sauve's Crevasse and Part II on Baldwin Wood

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with its NOLA versus Nature series. This week: WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Travis Lux look at the city’s drainage pumps, and the man behind their design -- Albert Baldwin Wood.

New Orleans is below sea level. You know this, and certainly, if you were here this past August, you really know this. Almost a foot of rain fell over a couple hours and parts of town were knee deep in water.

For the next few episodes TriPod dives into the city’s messy relationship with water through a new series called NOLA vs. Nature. First up: a look at the worst flood in New Orleans history — before Katrina.

 

It’s spring of 1849, and the Mississippi River is bursting at the seams. The river rises every spring from snow melt up north, but this particular spring, it’s getting unusually high.

A third confederate monument in New Orleans was removed in the middle of the night. The statue of P.G.T. Beauregard that once stood at the entrance to New Orleans’ City Park is now gone.

It took almost 7 hours for workers to strap the statue of confederate general PGT Beauregard and his horse to a crane and lift it onto a flatbed truck. Karen Murray was there in protest. She wiped away angry tears as she watched workers set up in the dark.

The Jefferson Davis statue was removed before sunrise on May 11th, 2017.  This is the second of four Confederate monuments slated for removal in New Orleans. Hours after the statue came down, WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke to Mayor Mitch Landrieu about the safety precautions and controversy surrounding the monument removal, and how this fits into his larger vision of the city’s path towards racial conciliation.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Dartmouth history professor Rashauna Johnson have talked before for the show. This time, their conversation was taped live during the 2017 Organization of American Historians conference that took place earlier this year. The two discussed Johnson’s first book, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions, which won the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history.

A second line parade took place on Sunday afternoon, May 8th in New Orleans to celebrate the removal of four of the city’s confederate monuments. The first confederate monument was removed in the early hours of April 24th. Three more are slated for removal. Those celebrating the removal of the monuments were met by protesters who oppose the removal process. Three people were arrested. 

The organizing group Take Em’ Down Nola held a parade to ‘bury white supremacy.’ Co-founder Malcolm Suber addressed the crowd.

A bill that provides for the conservation of public military memorials passed a state house committee this morning. The simple language of House Bill 71 doesn’t mention the word ‘confederate’, but it has everything to do with preserving the three remaining monuments that are slated for removal. Testimonies for and against State representative Thomas Carmody’s bill were directly related to the status of the PT Beauregard, Robert E Lee, and Jefferson Davis statues.

New Orleans has taken down one of the four confederate monuments slated for removal. Last night, protestors and counter protesters clashed at the Jefferson Davis monument in Mid City. 

A small group protesting the removal of the monuments stood guard over a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. They lit candles and waved confederate flags. Some were armed with assault weapons. A crowd of over 200 counter protesters joined the demonstration yelling ‘take ‘em down.’

Karen Alesich watched the scene from across the street as tensions rose.

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