Lee Rouse

LSU AgCenter's Lee Rouse is our new host for Bayou Garden.

Companion planting in gardening and agriculture is the planting of a second crop within the primary crop for purposes of pest control or pollination.

The second crop can also provide a habitat for beneficial insects, maximize use of space, or in some other way help increase the primary crop's productivity.


Horticulturists at LSUAgCenter's Hammond Research Station are on the hunt to rediscover underused landscape plants that have performance potential in Louisiana.

This program is called "Plants with Potential."

A core component of the program is offering plants that can be propogated without restrictions. Many newly-developed varieties on the market carry invention patents, which can be costly to wholesale growers.


Composting has benefits to the garden, gadener, and the environment. The number one benefit of composting is in the pocketbook. Here are some tips to getting started with your composting.

Make sure the bin is large enough to make the heat that is necessary to break down the material rapidly and to kill off weed seeds. One cubic yard is the magic size for compost bins. Sometimes with a new hobby, common wisdom says to start small. That's not the case with composting; bigger is better.


Everyone loves to garden when the weather is perfect, but the summer sets apart the hardcore pros from the novices. There is still plenty to do in the gardens in late July.

Tasks you can do for your vegetable garden in July include harvesting, planting, planning, and amending the soil for late fall and early winter vegetables.


Even the best of gardeners fall short of finding that perfect tomato fruit. Failure to set fruit can be caused by many different problems.


If you have bare spots in your lawn, June is still an acceptable time to lay sod. Leaving bare areas unattended in your lawn will lead to additional weed problems later in the growing season.

Large areas with no competition from gress are perfect for weeds. If your bare areas are too large, you might consider sod.


The month of June is always a reminder of that Louis Armstrong song, where he sings, "Do yo know what it means to miss New Orleans." That's the song where the lyrics go on to say he dreams of magnolias in bloom and wishes he were there.


What do okra, chocolate, hibiscus, and cotton all have in common?

Give up? These are all in the same botanical family: the Malvaceae family.

Okra is one of the easiest and most heat tolerant vegetable crops you can grow in the south. It's a staple of the home garden. When other vegetables start to peter out in the heat of summer, that's the time okra will stand tall in the garden.


The needs of our plants are similar to ours. They need to water to survive. But they need minerals to thrive. While humans might drink some iced tea for a bit of that sustenance, pouring iced tea on plants may not to much good.

But there is a "tea" of sorts for plants.


It's not quite summer yet, but the days are becoming longer and hotter. Heat can be unpleasant for people and for plants. That's sepcially the case when they don't have enough to drink.

The hotter it gets, the faster the water either evaporates from the soil or is consumed and then lost by the plant. Landscapers should make sure gardens receive about one inch of water per week. That means there needs to be at least an inch of rain, an inch of irrigated water, or a combination every week.


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