Nina Feldman

Nina Feldman is an independent producer based in New Orleans. She produces feature news stories for WWNO and her work has appeared on The World, Latino USA, NPR's The Salt, State of the Re:Union among others. She is also the founder and emcee of New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling, or NO LAW.

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, it’s our show, “How many Roads?" Bob Dylan’s Back Pages. Joan Baez sang and recorded many of Bob’s songs of love and loss. She spoke to host Nick Spitzer about her favorite love ballads, Dylan's lyrical writing, and being the subject of songs herself.

NS: I wonder, is there a single love song over the years that most endures for you?

JB: A single love song?

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. To hear the full program, tune into WWNO Saturday at 7 or Sunday at 6, or listen at Americanroutes.org.

Alynda Segarra grew up in a Puerto Rican family in the Bronx. As a teenager, she hit the road, hopping trains, living a traveler’s life. She wound up in New Orleans in 2007 and felt more at home here than anywhere else. Segarra played acoustic on street corners, and started the band Hurray for the Riff Raff.

These days, it can be hard to find trustworthy information on the internet - especially about sensitive topics, like Islam. That’s why for the past 3 years, one Muslim couple in Jefferson Parish has led a class at their mosque to teach the basics of Islam.

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, we travel to Teddy’s Juke Joint – right along blues highway 61 in Zachary, LA. It’s a small, double shotgun house at the end of a gravel road, lit up by Christmas lights all year round. Inside, you’ll find good times and good blues music, served up by Lloyd Johnson Jr., a well-dressed bear of a man in a red suit, sporting a large cowboy hat, and better known to the regulars as Teddy. 

Each Week, American Routes bring you Shortcuts, a sneak peak at our upcoming show. Johnnie Allan is a Swamp Pop legend, born John Allen Guillot, a sharecropper’s son. His mother and grandfather were musicians who played with family member Joe Falcon, on the first Cajun record in 1928. At 13, Johnnie Allan formed a Cajun Band. Later, he joined accordionist Lawrence Walker’s band on steel guitar.

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week, host Nick Spitzer talks to Wilco bandleader Jeff Tweedy. Tweedy tells of growing up in the blue-collar town of Belleville Illinois, where music became his creative outlet. To hear the full program, tune in Saturday at 7 or Sunday at 6 on WWNO, or listen at americanroutes.org

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. The Carolina Chocolate Drop began as a seminal African American group that revived the old time string band tradition of the Piedmont where black performers were formative from the 19th century onward. The Chocolate Drops started out as the Sankofa Strings, after meeting at the black banjo gathering in Boone, North Carolina, 2005. They evolved over the next decade. Rhiannon Giddens, trained formally in opera, played banjo and fiddle and sang with her band mates to growing audiences.

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week for Carnival Season, we bring you a bit of the action from the streets. We’ll catch up with Mardi Gras Indian Big Chief Monk Boudreaux and his followers on Mardi Gras Day.

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. One of the enduring heroes of club life in New Orleans is guitarist Ernie Vincent. Ernie’s parents spoke French- father played guitar and harmonica, and the family used to take regular trips to Thibodaux, LA where his uncles played juke joints and fish fries. Vincent learned to play Jimmy Reed tunes, met Little Johnny Taylor and Little Freddy King.

Pages