Noel King

Noel King is a correspondent for Planet Money.

Before coming to NPR in 2016, she was senior reporter for Marketplace's Wealth & Poverty desk and a fill-in host for the Marketplace Morning Report.

Her in-depth reporting at Marketplace investigated the causes and consequences of wealth and income inequality. She spent five months embedded in a pop-up news bureau examining the effects of gentrification on residents of a Los Angeles neighborhood, listened in as low-income and wealthy residents of a New Orleans neighborhood negotiated the best way to live side-by-side, searched for the meaning of "middle class" in Paducah, Kentucky, and spent time in Baltimore trying to determine how many jobs a $100 million dollar federal investment could create.

Noel spent five years covering conflicts in the Middle East and Africa. From 2011 to 2013, she was based in Cairo, reporting on the aftermath of Egypt's uprising for PRI's The World, the CBC, and the BBC. From 2004 to 2008, she was based first in Khartoum and later, Kigali, covering wars and their aftermath in Darfur, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, and Rwanda for Voice of America and wire services.

In 2008, Noel joined the inaugural team of The Takeaway, a live morning show produced by WNYC and PRI in collaboration with The New York Times. During her tenure as a managing producer, the show's coverage of race in America won an RTDNA UNITY Award. She also served as a fill-in host for The Takeaway.

Noel is a graduate of Brown University, and a native of Kerhonkson, N.Y.

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In the 20th century, Oneida was a household name: One of America's biggest flatware manufacturers. The company's knives and forks were a symbol of middle-class elegance. The advertising was so prolific, Oneida came to represent the very idea of a well-set table. The company was as American as the rolling hills and open farmland of Sherrill, NY - near Oneida - where the flatware was made.

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Four thousand or so people are struggling with a difficult question right now. They recently found out that they are descendants of slaves who were sold to pay a debt owed by Georgetown University. Georgetown is trying to make amends.

This is part two of a two part series. Listen to part one here.

This is part one of a two part series. Listen to part two here.

There's a running joke in Maringouin, Louisiana, a town of 1,100, that everyone is related. It's funny because, as people in Maringouin will tell you, it's true. Everyone calls each other 'cuz' or 'cousin,' and they mean it. People run into each other on the street, recognize a last name, start talking about people they know in common, then discover they're related.

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On today's show: stories about what happens when you actually read the fine print.

The fine print sends a Midwestern family on a two-thousand-mile road trip to open dozens of bank accounts.

It leads to a multi-million-dollar fight over the essence of the Snuggie. (Blanket? Or robe?)

And the fine print starts a fight over printer toner that goes all the way to the Supreme Court.

Also: cold beer. Via a loophole.

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