Tegan Wendland

Tegan Wendland is a freelance producer with a background in investigative news reporting. She currently produces the biweekly segment, Northshore Focus. 


The controversy continues over actors who were paid to attend public meetings and speak in support of a new Entergy power plant in New Orleans East.

In New Orleans, Mardi Gras is not just Fat Tuesday itself, it's a multi-week celebration. It's also a huge mess.

The plastic beads, cups, and trinkets that fly from the floats don't all get caught — even by the most enthusiastic crowds. And after a bead has hit the ground it immediately turns from prize to garbage, especially in this year's rain and mud.

Climate change skeptics, including President Donald Trump, have been vocal the past couple weeks about how cold snaps in the south and northeast do not fit in with the global warming narrative. On this week's coastal news roundup, Nola.com | The Times-Picayune environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Mark Schleifstein talk about how cold weather shakes out in a warming world.

This story is a collaboration with Reveal, the Center for Investigative Reporting, and PRX. You can share your own experience with increased flooding here.

For this week's coastal news roundup WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Tristan Baurick about new flood control management, illegal oystering, and a marsh grass die-off in the Mississippi Delta. 

The National Hurricane Center predicted 2017 to be an above-average year for storms. But so far Harvey and Irma have been some of the strongest storms on record.

Environmental reporter Mark Schleifstein has reported on hurricanes throughout his 33 years with The Times-Picayune. As a result, he's garnered quite a reputation.

With much of the Texas coast devastated by tropical storm Harvey, Louisiana continues to send help. Lake Charles has become a staging ground for relief efforts.

Under overcast skies, officials are urging caution, not panic, ahead of heavy weekend rains. The city has been on-edge since failures of the pumping system contributed to widespread flooding on Aug. 5.

Since then, some public officials have been fired— and some, but not all, of the pumps have been fixed.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu says the city remains vulnerable.

On this week's installment of the Louisiana coastal roundup, WWNO radio's interim news director, Tegan Wendland, and NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Mark Schleifstein talk about the largest low-oxygen dead zone in modern history along Louisiana's coast -- nearly 9,000 square miles, or as large as New Jersey.

Florida is facing major threats from climate change and sea level rise. Up to six feet of water could inundate the coast by the end of the century. Officials are trying to prepare and “resilience officers” are leading the charge in the Miami-area. 

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland met up with James Murley, Miami-Dade’s chief resilience officer, to talk about how the tourist mecca is grappling with these challenges. 

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Coypu Foundation and the Greater New Orleans Foundation.

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