Travis Lux

Travis Lux primarily contributes science and health stories to Louisiana's Lab. He studied anthropology and sociology at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and picked up his first microphone at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, MA. In his spare time he loves to cook -- especially soups and casseroles. 

Countries across the world are starting to ban some microplastics. Like microbeads — the tiny pieces of plastic used in soap and face washes.


This time of year in New Orleans, it’s almost raining plastic, from beads to glitter. Lots of glitter. But what happens to all that sparkly stuff after it washes away? WWNO’s Travis Lux took a look at the environmental consequences of glitter.

The bounty of the Louisiana Coast has helped make New Orleans a food capital. But humans have put the once-plentiful resources — like fish — at risk. 

On this week's coastal news roundup, environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick talk about how chefs, fishermen and companies are fighting to keep Louisiana on the food map.

The Sewerage and Water Board answered questions from New Orleans city council members Tuesday about the impact of last week’s freeze, but the agency is still taking stock.

A new study shows waterways across the country are getting saltier — including the Mississippi River. That has implications for the ecosystem and for drinking water.


The salt comes from two main places. Road salt — which is used to help melt ice and snow on roadways — and also agricultural fertilizers. Fertilizers often have potassium in them, which is a salt.

The state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) wants feedback on its list of projects for the next year. Officials are holding a series of public meetings. The first meeting was last night in Belle Chasse.


The state’s big-picture plan to protect and restore the coast is updated every five years — it includes plans for things like river diversions and rebuilding marshes. That’s the Master Plan. But the money for those projects is approved on a yearly basis — the Annual Plan.

People love talking about the weather. And we did a lot of talking during this year's busy hurricane season. Turns out the weather has a way of showing up in music — but less now than it used to.


WWNO’s Travis Lux talked with Paul Williams, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the UK, who studies how musicians write about the weather. He hopes climate change will inspire more weather-related music.


More than 20,000 scientists from around the world came to New Orleans this week for the American Geophysical Union conference. From minerals and volcanoes to oceans, space, and climate change -- they presented all kinds of research.


Sara Sneath from Times-Picayune was there. So was WWNO’s Travis Lux. This week on the Coastal News Roundup, they met up at the conference to talk about the latest in coastal research.

Every summer, a "dead zone" forms in the Gulf of Mexico. It’s an area where the oxygen is so low that aquatic mammals can't survive. This year the dead zone was the biggest on record.


Tulane University has awarded $1 million to a company to help shrink it.

Every Friday, coastal reporters from WWNO and | The Times-Picayune come together to talk about the week in coastal news.

This week: a platform fire in the Gulf, concern around Sewerage and Water Board contracts and an effort to rebuild the coast from the sky.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: legal stuff!