Travis Lux

Travis Lux primarily contributes science and health stories to Louisiana's Lab. He studied anthropology and sociology at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and picked up his first microphone at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, MA. In his spare time he loves to cook -- especially soups and casseroles. 

Louisiana spends hundreds of millions of dollars every year to restore and protect the coastline with big earth-moving projects, like building marshes and barrier islands.

 

Much of the money the state plans to get through the BP oil spill settlement will go toward big construction projects -- building barrier islands and levees.

Cities and parishes across the coast are bracing for the potential impact of Tropical Storm Cindy and urging citizens to stay safe

 

The Louisiana oil and gas industry in Louisiana is asking President Trump not to take coastal restoration money away from the state.

 

The funding issue at hand is the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA).

 

Oil and gas companies have to pay for leases if they want to drill in the Gulf of Mexico. The federal government makes money from those leases. GOMESA is a law that requires the government share some of that money with the states on the gulf coast -- including Louisiana.

Several federal agencies are teaming up to do a multi-year survey of marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal is to better understand how oil and gas activities impact marine species, and it’s huge in scope.

 

If you want to know how oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico impacts water creatures -- or how to minimize those impacts -- you have to know as much as you can about them.

Last week President Trump pulled the U.S out of the Paris Climate Agreement -- or Paris Climate Accord. When it was ratified in 2015 it was a big deal -- almost every country in the world met in Paris to agree on a way to fight climate change.

 

But Trump says the deal isn’t good for business. Pulling out could have implications for Louisiana. WWNO's Travis Lux talked with Dr. Bob Thomas, professor of environmental communication at Loyola University, about what it will mean.

 

Today, Thursday, June 1st, is the official start of hurricane season.

 

Local officials say they’re ready. But they want to make sure you are too, and hope some new technology helps.

 

If there’s one thing state and local officials want you to know, it’s this: have a plan.

The Trump administration has released a more detailed budget proposal for the next fiscal year, which would mean less money for coastal restoration in Louisiana.

 

Funding for the Coastal Master Plan is cobbled together from several different places -- like the State of Louisiana, the Federal government, and the BP oil spill settlement.

The Mississippi River remains high as floodwater makes its way south from the Midwest, and the Army Corps of Engineers is inspecting the levees daily for problems like leaks.

The outlook for the shipping industry under President Donald Trump, so far, has been a bit of a mixed bag. Some policies will be good for business, others might hamper it.

 

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