Travis Lux

Travis Lux primarily contributes science and health stories to Louisiana's Lab. He studied anthropology and sociology at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and picked up his first microphone at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, MA. In his spare time he loves to cook -- especially soups and casseroles. 

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, the state gets more money to figure out how to stop the invasive bug killing the coastal marsh. Plus, two state legislators get into bar fight over coastal restoration.

 

Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune breaks down the week in coastal news with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Over the past century, Louisiana has lost more than 2,000 square miles of coastline, leaving it more vulnerable to storms, flooding and sea level rise. State officials have been fighting back, building levees, artificial marshes and barrier islands. Now they want to harness the muddy Mississippi River, diverting its sediment-rich waters into shrinking marshes and wetlands.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: an update on the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline, plus some of the big picture questions it raises about coastal restoration strategies.

The federal government held an auction Wednesday for oil and gas drilling leases in the Gulf of Mexico. The Trump administration is pushing for an expansion of offshore drilling, and there has been a lot of anticipation around this sale — the largest ever in the Gulf, with 77-million acres up for grabs.

Countries across the world are starting to ban some microplastics. Like microbeads — the tiny pieces of plastic used in soap and face washes.

 

This time of year in New Orleans, it’s almost raining plastic, from beads to glitter. Lots of glitter. But what happens to all that sparkly stuff after it washes away? WWNO’s Travis Lux took a look at the environmental consequences of glitter.

The bounty of the Louisiana Coast has helped make New Orleans a food capital. But humans have put the once-plentiful resources — like fish — at risk. 

On this week's coastal news roundup, Nola.com/Times-Picayune environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick talk about how chefs, fishermen and companies are fighting to keep Louisiana on the food map.

The Sewerage and Water Board answered questions from New Orleans city council members Tuesday about the impact of last week’s freeze, but the agency is still taking stock.

A new study shows waterways across the country are getting saltier — including the Mississippi River. That has implications for the ecosystem and for drinking water.

 

The salt comes from two main places. Road salt — which is used to help melt ice and snow on roadways — and also agricultural fertilizers. Fertilizers often have potassium in them, which is a salt.

The state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) wants feedback on its list of projects for the next year. Officials are holding a series of public meetings. The first meeting was last night in Belle Chasse.

 

The state’s big-picture plan to protect and restore the coast is updated every five years — it includes plans for things like river diversions and rebuilding marshes. That’s the Master Plan. But the money for those projects is approved on a yearly basis — the Annual Plan.

People love talking about the weather. And we did a lot of talking during this year's busy hurricane season. Turns out the weather has a way of showing up in music — but less now than it used to.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux talked with Paul Williams, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the UK, who studies how musicians write about the weather. He hopes climate change will inspire more weather-related music.

 

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