Vanessa Romo

Moments into his highly anticipated on-camera briefing Wednesday — the first after a seven-day absence — Trump press secretary Sean Spicer was asked about the persistent rumor that he will soon transition into a new role within the White House communications team — one that removes him from the spotlight and into a less visible position.

He opted for an indirect response to a very direct question: "I'm still here."

Conservatives won't have Julius Caesar to kick around anymore.

The latest production in the Public Theater's Shakespeare in the Park series is closing Sunday — presumably bringing an end to demonstrations outside of the Delacorte Theater but unlikely to quell the raging debates over exactly whom is entitled to free speech, under what circumstances and over the limits of artistic expression. Those debates are not likely to subside, especially as the appetite for creative works tackling an array of political themes continues to grow.

As far as standard photo op images go — the kind where one has 10 seconds to hit a mark, smile and pose — this one is definitely memorable.

Rhode Island teacher Nikos Giannopoulos is holding a delicate black lace fan while wearing a rainbow LGBTQ pin on a blue print jacket, a silver and gold statement necklace and a nose ring as he stands beside the president and the first lady in the Oval Office.

President Donald Trump may not have the most Twitter followers on the platform but he is probably the most powerful person in the world who is tweeting on a regular basis. (Look no further than the recent "covfefe" incident and the raging wildfire of memes it incited.)

While former FBI director James Comey was testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee Thursday, several hundred attendees from across the country listened to President Trump share the administration's religious agenda. The luncheon headlined by Trump was the kick-off event of the Faith and Freedom Coalition's 2017 Road to Majority gathering taking place in Washington, D.C., over three days.

Thousands of protesters gathered around the country in a series of "March for Truth" rallies on Saturday. Demonstrators were calling for a congressional independent commission to investigate connections between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

In full view of the White House, protesters in Washington, D.C., demanded answers in the ongoing Russia probe. Chants of "Investigate Trump!" and "Resist, resist!" rang across the National Mall.

Some protesters even lined up together to spell out "Investigate Trump."

This week's physical assault by Montana's new GOP Congressman, Greg Gianforte against The Guardian reporter, Ben Jacobs — who was asking a question about the budget — is the latest example of hostility toward journalists.

President Trump's first day in Saudi Arabia began with a lavish reception and ended with an ostentatious ceremony, but not before Trump and the Saudi king signed several agreements spanning diplomatic, governmental and commercial ventures, including an arms deal worth $110 billion.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The latest must-see TV are apparently White House press briefings. People are tuning in in record numbers. NPR's Vanessa Romo checked in with some young viewers and asked them, why are you watching?

There's a famous story about how Lana Turner was discovered: sitting in a Hollywood drugstore, sipping a soda. Next thing you know, she's one of the most sought after "It" girls of the 1940s.

There may be some key details left out of that account, but one can assume, at least in theory, that it makes sense.

What doesn't necessarily make sense? The recent fever pitch over 78-year-old Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., who has been adopted by a new generation as "Auntie Maxine."

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