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Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 14 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system. 

 A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C., Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA, and Bob Lenox at KEDM in Monroe.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. Remember this woman?

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UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Where's the beef?

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CPAC In The Trump Era

9 hours ago

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The proposed border wall between the U.S. and Mexico would run right through Native lands, and tribal leaders in the region say it would desecrate sacred sites.

"Over my dead body will we build a wall," says Verlon Jose, vice chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation. "It's like me going into your home and saying 'You know what? I believe in order to protect your house we need some adjusting.' And you're going to say, 'Wait a minute, who are you to come into my house and tell me how to protect my home?' " he says.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election.

Keitra Bates is standing in front of an empty storefront on the west side of Atlanta, Ga. The walls are yellow-painted stucco over cinderblocks, with iron bars on the windows and doors, and a small side yard littered with abandoned tires. A corner store, the Fair Street Superette, is next door.

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