bayou

ULM Reveals New Logo and ‘The Best Is On The Bayou’

Aug 15, 2017
ULM OPI

The past begets the future. The building blocks of those who came before shape what is and what is to come.

The Office of Marketing and Communications team at the University of Louisiana Monroe, led by Chief Communications Officer Lisa Miller, found solace in that thought, and inspiration as well, as they worked on the daunting task assigned by ULM President Dr. Nick Bruno.

Belted Kingfisher

Aug 14, 2017

In teaching kids how to fish, one of the first obstacles that must be overcome is what has to be an innate urge to throw rocks and sticks into the water for the sheer joy of it.  Every fisherman knows that such commotions only scare the fish away.  Within the world of birds though, some of the best fishers actually incorporate this behavior into their pedagogy.

Dendritic Patterns

May 1, 2017
Devin Stein / Flickr.com https://tinyurl.com/muzzbbh

Persistent patterns of nature permeate our bodies and our environment, and for the most part go unrecognized by all but the very observant. One ubiquitous design is the dendritic pattern.

Dendritic refers to a shape that resembles a branch tree. It is a pattern that is associated with growth or movement. Consider how the main trunk of a oak forks into large limbs that form again and again into smaller branches and twigs.

Pawpaws

Apr 28, 2017
Anna Hesser / Flickr.com https://tinyurl.com/m5qtlj5

During one of the earliest European explorations of interior North America in 1541 Hernando de Soto's scribes wrote of a particular tropical-like fruit that was being cultivated by Native Americans.

When President Thomas Jefferson sent William Dunbar and George Hunter to explore the Ouachita River in 1804, Hunter recorded a small Bayou named after this plant that entered the river on the east side about a league above the mouth of Bayou Bartholomew.

Carolina Wren

Apr 3, 2017

Though mates for life, for much of the year they sleep on opposite sides of our house in the woods.  One we call the east wren.  This is the male.  The west wren is the female that sometimes roosts above the front door or in a wind chime that she often rings on a dead calm evening seemingly for her own amusement.

Louisiana Ferries

Mar 27, 2017

Louisiana's bayous and rivers have long been considered blessings and banes, depending on one's preferred mode of transportation.  In a land laced with aquatic arteries, streams were the only practical means of conveyance for centuries.  Only when colonial authorities began planning a system of roads to facilitate European settlement and economic development did the waterways become appreciated as substantial barriers to progress.

Swamp Sleep

Mar 20, 2017

Swamps sleep naked and are slow to awaken.  Long after green-up in the uplands, deep overflow swamps that sustain Louisiana bayous and rivers remain quiescent, prolonging winter dormancy until the threat of natural spring flooding has past.

Box Turtles

Jan 4, 2017

That an old, time-marred box turtle in my hand today could be the same one held by my great grandfather on the edge of this swamp a hundred years ago infers a connection mystical if not spiritual.  Though unlikely, it is possible.

 

http://www.louisianadeltaballet.com/

Friday night, December 16th the Monroe Civic Center will be filled for the annual Louisiana Delta Ballet Christmas Gala. This year's ballet is 'Twas the Night Before a Cajun Christmas, a Southern take on the classic holiday story.

In this re-imagined story, Santa faces a swamp witch when he stops his new sleigh in New Orleans. Santa will have to work with frogs, alligators, lightning bugs, and crawfish, along with other bayou creatures to bring a happy ending to this Christmas season. 

Bayou Boats

May 23, 2016

For as long as humans have dwelled on our bayou-laced landscape, boats have drifted among the placid waters.  Local Native Americans built watercraft for 400 generations before European immigrants arrived to mimic their designs.  For efficient travel and trade in a wilderness world of wetlands, there were no other options.  The earliest boats were dugout canoes or pirogues.  Hewn from logs of virgin cypress or water tupelo, some were large enough to carry a dozen passengers or a thousand pounds of freight.

  

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