Bayou-Diversity

Kelby Ouchley, wildlife biologist, author and radio host, will speak on American alligators Thursday, Feb. 1 at 4:30 p.m. in the Union Museum of History and Art in Farmerville. Ouchley wrote a book on the subject in 2013 titled, American Alligator: Ancient Predator in the Modern World. The talk is the first of several events in conjunction with the museum's exhibit of art by nine regional wildlife artists.

 

Wildlife Values

Jan 8, 2018
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

Most Bayou Diversity programs involve wildlife in some form or fashion.  But who places value on wildlife and just how much is wildlife worth these days?  A recent report issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is enlightening.

Bobcats

Jan 1, 2018
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

I saw a ghost a while back.  He appeared out of thin air, transformed a peaceful, bucolic scene into murderous chaos, and vanished in seconds.  I loved it.  It was one of the never-to-be-forgotten highlights of my experiences in the natural world.

Wise Ones

Dec 25, 2017
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

We are losing the old wise ones.  Some of our most erudite naturalists never heard a professor's lecture or studied in a biology lab that reeked of formalin and moth balls.  Still, they know the eddies where giant flathead catfish prowl and ridge-top trails of foraging coyotes.

Ouchley
K. Ouchley

Historians agree that the American president with the greatest conservation legacy was Theodore Roosevelt.  Among his many accomplishments in that arena was the protection of millions of acres that became units of the National Forest and National Park systems.  Additionally, he protected another group of lands and waters specifically for their wildlife values.  These became components of the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Fox Folklore

Dec 11, 2017
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

While on a late afternoon walk in the bottom north of the house, I heard a commotion in the dry, freshly fallen leaves beyond the creek.  Something was coming my way.  Suddenly, a red fox appeared in mid-air as he leaped across Rocky Branch, barely flowing in the late autumn drought.

Ouchley
K. Ouchley

Thank you, O Lord, in this bountiful season for the five senses to relish your world.  

Thank you for the succulent smells of the fruits of the earth in the kitchens of our mothers and wives.

Thank you for the odor of rich delta dirt on a warm, foggy winter morning.

Thank you for the smell of wood smoke, especially that tinted with lighter'd pine.

Thank you for the stew of odors distinct to our rivers and bayous: cypress needles, primal water, life and life-to be.

Wilderness

Nov 6, 2017
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

As a species we humans are infamous for behavior not conducive to our own long-term well-being.  Consider the frequency of wars, the unbridled depletion of earth's finite resources, and the "me now" attitude of our consumptive society.  There are, however, shining examples of far-sightedness in America, even in the halls of Congress.  A prime example is the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Louisiana Hippos

Oct 23, 2017
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

When it comes to politics, especially in Louisiana, one really can't make some of this stuff up.  Absurd political conduct has a long history in the Bayou State as illustrated by Congressman Robert Broussard's legislation, H.R. 23261, introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1910.  The press labeled it the "American Hippo Bill."

Eclipse and Science

Oct 16, 2017
Ouchley
K. Ouchley

What a glorious event it was, this eclipse of 2017.  With family and friends we gathered in a remote sagebrush meadow along the South Fork of the Payette River in Idaho, a stream fresh from the Sawtooth Wilderness that still carried snowmelt even on this late summer morning.  Our chosen viewing post fell directly in the path of the umbra - the shadow projected when the sun is entirely blocked by the moon.

Pages