Jeremy Alford

Road Travel America / Flickr.com / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

First Assistant Kyle Ardoin will take over the agency that handles elections starting May 8th . Ardoin is replacing Secretary of State Tom Schedler, who submitted his resignation papers in the wake of a sexual harassment scandal. Ardoin knows he’s been put in charge during a pivotal time for the department.

 

Ardoin says, "The purchasing of new voting equipment and the perfection of the 2018 congressional midterm elections are high profile, high stakes, and high impact for voters across this state." 

 

Wayne Hsieh / Flickr.com / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

There’s only two months left in the fiscal year, and doubts are growing as to whether a spending plan for next budget year can be approved in the current regular session. A 648-million dollar budget gap is forcing lawmakers to consider deep cuts in state spending. LaPolitics.com Publisher Jeremy Alford says we’re approaching uncharted waters.

 

Road Travel America / Flickr.com / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

All hope appears lost that the state legislature will pass any tax measures in this special session to address a nearly one-billion dollar shortfall. A sales tax bill that would provide nearly 300-million dollars in revenues was defeated soundly for a second time last night. Jeremy Alford, the publisher of LA-politics-dot-com, was there for the vote.

Alford says that the bill "went down in flames" with a 33-70 vote. 

 

Antrell Williams / Flickr.com / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Today is the deadline for Governor John Bel Edwards to call a February special session to address the looming one billion dollar budget hole resulting in the expiration of sales taxes. The governor said he would not call the session without an agreement in principle on a fiscal cliff deal, but LAPoltics.com publisher Jeremy Alford says the governor is being pushed to call the session.

 

Because it’s a revenue issue, the fiscal cliff can only be addressed in a special session.

 

It’s past the half-way mark in this year’s session of the state Legislature. One political expert sees a change in tone on the way.

So far the legislative action has been in House committees. Jeremy Alford, publisher of LA Politics Weekly, says the second half is being controlled by Senate lawmakers in a much different political situation than their colleagues chairing major House panels.