KEDM

Dean Jarvey / Flickr.com / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

KEDM2 Ideas  will be simulcasting programming from the main channel  for a few days during some infrastructure upgrades.   The all news and information channel will return as soon as possible. 

Thanks you for your patience during this transition. 

Cory Crowe / KEDM

90.3 KEDM Public Radio hosts Policy and a Pint: Ouachita Runs Dry-The Decline of a River System on Tuesday April 11 at 6 p.m. Topics to be discussed include river health, drinking water, economic impact, agricultural impact, industry and recreational use of the Ouachita River.

Jay Curtis / KEDM

KEDM will host Policy and a Pint on February 7 at Does Eat Place in Monroe.  The topic of our open public forum is Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. The event will look at ways to reduce waste going into our environment and landfill. 

Our panel will include Stuart Hodnet of Ouachita Green, Josh Tolleson of Goodwill Industries, and Alan Brockman of Sunquest Properties.  They will answer questions from the public about environmental issues and proposals and projects that will keep our area beautiful  and our landfill clean. 

Pallid Sturgeon

May 30, 2016

For a very long time, 70 million years or so, a strange sort of fish has been swimming along the sandy bottoms of North America's largest rivers.  They have neither bones nor scales.  Instead they have a cartilaginous skeleton and rows of bony scutes for protection.  An elongated snout, asymmetrical, scimitar-shaped tail, and whisker-like barbels add to their bizarre appearance and reputation as living fossils.

  

Bayou Boats

May 23, 2016

For as long as humans have dwelled on our bayou-laced landscape, boats have drifted among the placid waters.  Local Native Americans built watercraft for 400 generations before European immigrants arrived to mimic their designs.  For efficient travel and trade in a wilderness world of wetlands, there were no other options.  The earliest boats were dugout canoes or pirogues.  Hewn from logs of virgin cypress or water tupelo, some were large enough to carry a dozen passengers or a thousand pounds of freight.

  

Tanner's Cottonwood

May 16, 2016

A saddled horse standing beside a giant eastern cottonwood is the subject of a nitrate-based cellulose negative given to me by the man who took the shot in 1938 while prowling about for ivory-billed woodpeckers in Louisiana's vast Tensas Swamp.  The tree appears to be nearly as wide as James Tanner's sorrel gelding is long.  Even in what then was the closest thing remaining to a large, old-growth bottomland hardwood forest in America, the tree in its size was an anomaly.  

Six years ago I was swept into the wild currents of an event that has proven to be the largest environmental calamity of its type in the history of man - the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Not long retired, I was recruited to help assess the impacts of the ongoing disaster on Delta and Breton National Wildlife Refuges near the mouth of the Mississippi River.  Working out of a government facility at Venice, we lived in an atmosphere electric with frenzied activity, excitement, and danger.

  

Ecotone

Jan 18, 2016

The term "ecotone" can be defined as a transition area between two adjacent ecological communities.  It usually has some common characteristics of each bordering community and often contains species not found in either of the two.  Ecotones exist at different scales.  It may be the edge of your back yard where it butts up against a bayou or patch of woods.  It can be a 20-mile wide strip that separates the eastern front of the Rocky Mountains from the Great Plains or the northern evergreen forests from the tundra.

  

Thank you, O Lord, in this bountiful season for the five senses to relish your world.  Thank you for the succulent smells of the fruits of the earth in the kitchens of our mothers and wives.  Thank you for the odor of rich delta dirt on a warm, foggy, winter morning.  Thank you for the smell of wood smoke; especially that tinted with lightered pine.  

In retirement they seem innocent enough, often sitting quietly in the side-yard holding bouquets of pansies.  Back in their day though, they were instruments of hard manual labor, especially for Louisiana women who dreaded their weekly encounters.  For them, cast iron wash pots were undesirable necessities.

    

Pages