Louisiana News

Stories and interviews from across the state.

Sam the Dog and I walked in the early morning darkness the other day after a blue Norther blew through. I was bundled up against the wind, Sam tugging against the leash, enjoying the drop in temperatures. Leaves skittered across the pavement, which made a naturally skittish dog occasionally flinch. Even after more than two years of affection and living the good life, Sam still bears psychic scars. He was clearly mistreated before my wife found him lying up the hill in the street two years ago, with matted smelly fur and a look of resignation in his eyes. He had given up.

Lately, people have noticed that my dog Sparky seems to have gained some weight. Luckily, he’s not sensitive to the comments, but it has made me wonder if I need to add a few more minutes to our daily walk, or put less kibble in his bowl. 

Tête-à-Tête is a new series that uncovers extended versions of interviews conducted by WWNO journalists. Broadcasting means time limits, and often conversations that range from thirty to forty minutes in length get thirty to forty seconds on air. Tête-à-Tête brings these "private" discussions to light, and goes deeper into the issue at hand.

If tropical weather approaches the U.S. next year, coastal residents will see separate warnings about storm surge in addition to warnings about tropical storm- and hurricane-force winds.

National Hurricane Center officials said Thursday that separate warnings for storm surge should provide emergency managers and the public with better information about tropical weather hazards.

Storm surge is considered the greatest threat to life and property from a tropical cyclone. It can strike at different times and in different places than a storm's winds.

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan addressed the annual lunch for the nonprofit Bureau of Governmental Research on Thursday.

He called New Orleans an example for the nation in school innovation, and cited a long list of statistics in achievement improvements since 2005. Then, 60 percent of students attended a failing school, while that number has dropped to 5 percent today.

Duncan noted that New Orleanians, more than most, know the pain that comes with drastic school change. In the battle for better public education, he said, "you are absolutely winning."

The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation unwrapped a gift to the city on Friday — complete with a giant red bow. City officials, musicians, and New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival founder George Wein cut the ribbon on the George and Joyce Wein Jazz and Heritage Center.

 

The former funeral home in the 1200 block of Rampart Street has been redeveloped as a jazz education center. Free classes for budding musicians will be held in rooms full of instruments, music stands, and screens for digital and remote learning.

"The Great Invisible" is a new documentary about the 2010 BP Oil Spill opening on December 12 at the Prytania Theater. Margaret Brown, the movie's director, grew up on the Alabama coast and saw the impact the spill had on her family and neighbors.

New Orleans is a beautiful city. But very little of that beauty is natural. Even our magnificent parks and tree lined avenues are planned and planted. Mostly, when we talk about the beauty of New Orleans, we're talking about buildings.

A trio of early 1900s buildings in downtown Shreveport – including one on the city’s demolition list – are being brought back to life.

Pre-leasing is underway for more than 50 apartments on Texas Street. At a press conference Wednesday, city leaders announced the names of businesses that will open in the development, including a coffee shop, nightclub, sushi bar, and vintage clothier.

New Orleans developer Roland von Kurnatowski has been working to rehab the buildings for almost two years.

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