Louisiana News

Stories and interviews from across the state.

This week on All Things New Orleans, we discuss the city's gun violence with Crime Analyst, Jeff Asher. Then Jessica Rosgaard returns with The Advocate's Stephanie Grace as we end the 2017 Legislative session. 

We'll also chat with Olympic Gold medalist Cullen Jones about the USA Swimming Foundation's Make a Splash Initiative. And musician Greg Schatz shares his new album, Small Peace of Mind

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has honored a National Guard helicopter crew that rescued six people during floods last year. 

 The Bayou 69 crew first rescued a wildlife agent and firefighter whose boat overturned while they tried to rescue two people along the Dugdemona River east of Winnfield in Winn Parish. Other boats and a high-water vehicle couldn't get to them, and the two held onto their overturned boat for hours.

BUDGET FAILS,  SPECIAL SESSION BEGINS: Yesterday  Louisiana lawmakers had a dramatic show-down in state budget negotiations as the House and Senate ended the regular legislative session in a deadlock.  At the heart of the matter: The Senate plan would’ve  spent all money available, saving Higher Education and TOPS Tuition from further cuts…and addressing prisons, social services, and health care;  WHEREAS  the  House wanted to keep about  $50 million in reserve to offset any unforeseen circumstances.

It appeared no lawmakers wanted a special session, so when Appropriations chair Cameron Henry told the House there was no budget deal – with 30 minutes left on the regular session clock -- the end of the regular session turned into something resembling a bench-clearing brawl.


American Routes Shortcuts: Nick Spitzer

Jun 8, 2017

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. This week the tables are turned as host Nick Spitzer appears as a guest on his own show, confessing his musical guilty pleasures to producer Betsy Shepherd and telling stories through his favorite songs.

Betsy Shepherd: When most people say guilty pleasures they’re referring to something they’re ashamed of, as in lowbrow entertainment. What do you mean by guilty pleasures?

 

This one is the tale of the man with the Creole tomato tattoo. It’s a story for the season and, really, a reason to take heart as another New Orleans summer descends.


The Louisiana oil and gas industry in Louisiana is asking President Trump not to take coastal restoration money away from the state.

 

The funding issue at hand is the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA).

 

Oil and gas companies have to pay for leases if they want to drill in the Gulf of Mexico. The federal government makes money from those leases. GOMESA is a law that requires the government share some of that money with the states on the gulf coast -- including Louisiana.

house.gov

Congressman Ralph Abraham says he is waiting to hear potential evidence former FBI Director James Comey may have on his discussions with President Donald Trump.

 "He (Trump) probably did indeed tell Comey that he wished he would let the Flynn thing go," says Abraham.

Rep. Abraham says he believes this was just a conversation between two men and doesn't rise to the level of obstruction.  Abraham says if Comey had something of substance before today then he was legally responsible to report it.  

 Complete coverage of the Comey testimony is available at KEDM.org 

Several federal agencies are teaming up to do a multi-year survey of marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal is to better understand how oil and gas activities impact marine species, and it’s huge in scope.

 

If you want to know how oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico impacts water creatures -- or how to minimize those impacts -- you have to know as much as you can about them.

To the uninitiated, this final day of the session may look like one long cocktail party, with knots of people conversing quietly here and there, as both the House and Senate take lengthy recesses. But those clusters of conversation are actually conference committees, working to resolve differences over the contents of bills.

I sat down with the man who knows the most about conference committees – John Alario. Having served as Speaker twice and Senate President twice, he says there is a strategy to picking the three conferees from each chamber.

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