Health & Science

Health and Science news

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

We are back with NPR congressional correspondent Sue Davis, who's still on the line. Hey there again.

SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: Hey, Kelly.

MCEVERS: And we also have White House correspondent Scott Horsley, too. Hi there, Scott.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Right. Congressman Mike Kelly is a Republican from Pennsylvania. He had supported the Republican health care bill. He joins us now. Welcome to the program, Congressman.

MIKE KELLY: Thank you, Audie. Thanks for having me.

Doctors say it all started eight years ago, when a urology clinic in Oregon ran an ad promoting the benefits of scheduling a vasectomy in March.

"You go in for a little snip, snip and come out with doctor's orders to sit back and watch nonstop basketball," the voice-over promises. "If you miss out on this, you'll end up recovering during a weekend marathon of Desperate Housewives!"

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

flickr.com/Neeta Lind / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Arkansas lawmakers have given final legislative approval and sent to the governor a bill limiting where medical marijuana patients can smoke the drug.

 

The state Senate voted 31-1 Thursday for the bill to prohibit smoking medical marijuana anywhere tobacco smoke is banned. It also bans anyone under 21 from smoking medical marijuana, bans smoking the drug around anyone under the age of 14 or knowingly smoking the drug in the presence of a pregnant woman. It would also ban smoking medical pot in motor vehicles, aircraft or motorized watercraft.

 

A last-minute attempt by conservative Republicans to dump standards for health benefits in plans sold to individuals would probably lower the average person's upfront insurance costs, such as premiums and deductibles, say analysts on both sides of the debate to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

But it will very likely also induce insurers to offer much skimpier plans, potentially excluding the gravely ill and putting consumers at greater financial risk if they need care.

Throughout the campaign, President Trump billed himself as a master negotiator who would make the "best deals" for the American people.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When the Food and Drug Administration created controls in January on how farmers can give antibiotics to livestock, scientists concerned about antibiotic resistance and advocates for animal welfare called it a historic shift in how meat animals are raised.

But a new federal report, released last week, says the long-awaited FDA initiative — first attempted back in 1977 — falls short in so many areas that it may not create the change that backers hoped for.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You're going to hear a lot of this kind of wordplay today. The Republican health care plan is on life support...

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