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A federal judge in Washington has ordered the Trump administration to allow a detained teenage who is in the U.S. illegally to have an abortion.

The 17-year-old, identified in court documents only as "Jane Doe," is being held in a private facility in Texas after she was apprehended crossing the U.S.-Mexico border last month. She is 15 weeks pregnant and has asked for an abortion.

By the end of November 1965, U.S. officials were well aware that mass murders were underway. At this point, roughly two months into an Indonesian military campaign that would ultimately kill at least half a million people, U.S. Embassy staff privately expressed no shock in reporting that thousands had already been summarily executed.

They did comment on the resourcefulness of the killers, though.

If there's one thing President Trump's critics want from him, and he refuses to give up, it's his tax returns.

The returns didn't come up during Wednesday's hearing in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan. But the hearing was the first step in a process that could loosen Trump's grip on them.

If the next step goes the plaintiffs' way, the case could make the president's tax returns surface.

Editor's note: This story contains graphic language.

As women around the world tell their stories of sexual harassment and assault using the phrase "#MeToo," one prominent voice added her own harrowing account.

Four American soldiers were killed in action in Niger this month.

Their deaths made a few headlines at the time. But this week they are in the news again, with far more prominence, because of a bitter political debate over presidential condolence calls.

The sudden prominence of the soldiers' deaths — but in a way that highlights political tension and factual disputes, rather than honoring of sacrifice — has left some military advocates struggling for words and striving to redirect attention back to the original loss.

This past spring, David Mifflin looked at his credit report online and saw that something wasn't right.

There were inquiries from Chase Bank about an application for a credit card that someone was trying to open in his name. Mifflin, who lives in San Antonio, says he called the bank and was told the identity thieves "had my Social Security number."

He set up fraud alerts with the three major credit reporting companies. But he says the fraudulent attempts to open credit cards continued "multiple times a week, multiple times a day."

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