Sue Lincoln

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

They’re willing, apparently, to leave here without funding the government. Then why should we fund any other part of it?”

Franklin Representative Sam Jones is referring to the Republican House leadership. He is one of the House Democrats who blocked HB 3, the capital outlay funding bill, Wednesday evening.


The full House had a lot on the docket Wednesday: capital outlay, the gasoline tax, and more than a dozen tax reform bills. But little of it went as planned.


A bill to increase the grade-point average to qualify for a four-year TOPS award is headed to the Senate – but not without some controversy along the way.


The House Civil Law Committee began working through proposed constitutional amendments Monday.

Right now there are 50 constitutional amendments out there,” staff attorney Robert Singletary advised the members.

They weren’t debating the content of the amendments, just okaying the ballot language, in case any of those measures make it through the legislative process.

Compare and Contrast

May 22, 2017

Secretary of State Tom Schedler and Attorney General Jeff Landry have some similarities: both are statewide elected officials, both are Republicans, and both are frustrated with the proposed state budget. But their reasons are entirely different.


Governor John Bel Edwards saw some victories for his agenda in the Senate this week, with the advancement of criminal justice reforms and anti-discrimination legislation, as well as a bill to increase the minimum wage. The House, on the other hand?

Quite frankly, I’m disappointed – particularly in the House,” the governor said, with a sigh.


There is much that divides Louisiana’s lawmakers, but when it comes to criminal justice reform and reinvestment…

“Representative Leger and I finally found something we can agree on,” Denham Springs Republican Valarie Hodges said, with a laugh.

“Love it!” New Orleans Democrat Walt Leger responded.


What we constantly are hearing is ‘Our hands are tied because we have dedicated funds in the constitution’,” Baton Rouge Representative Franklin Foil reminded the House Appropriations Committee Monday.

But the question of whether to dedicate or undedicate state funds may ultimately be left to voters, as state lawmakers are moving forward with constitutional amendments proposing to tie up more money, as well as one to unlock funds that are currently off limits.


Nothing Personal

May 15, 2017

The friction between House Republican leadership and Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards is no secret. But is it just partisan politics, or is it personal? I sat down with House Appropriations Chairman Cameron Henry to try and find out.

The governor and I get along just fine,” Henry insisted. “We went deer hunting once, duck hunting twice last season. No, personally, he and I get along just fine.”

The full House put a number of bills through the mill Thursday, having some bi-partisan fun along the way.

This is my rescue-a-Republican-bill day,” New Iberia Democrat Terry Landry joked, as he helped Denham Springs Republican Valerie Hodges pass her ignition interlock bill.


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