Time to Talk

3:45 p.m. Wednesdays and 6:45 a.m. Thursdays

Parents and professionals need timely education on the laws, science, society, and culture that children are up against everyday.

Time to Talk brings you accurate and appropriate information from state and local experts about issues that affect children, so that you can understand and communicate with and about them.

Through this segment, you'll develop a sophisticated understanding of the issues faced by youth today and be encouraged to confidently discuss tough topics that face our children.

Time to Talk is produced with the Children's Coalition for Northeast Louisiana and BayouLife Magazine.

Ways to Connect

How Parents Can Talk to Teens About Reproductive Health

Feb 20, 2018
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ / U.S. Department of Agriculture

It's never too early for parents to have "the Talk" with their children. Dr. Ryan Pasternak, associate professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans, informs and encourages parents to be proactive with reproductive education. 

Pasternak says that parents tend to have the conversation about sexual health as a reaction to something else. It's imperative for parents to share accurate and appropriate information with their children to combat poor advice from peers. 

MFer Photography / Flickr.com https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In most cases, a child's brain is fully developed by age three. Patti McGilton, mental health consultant at the Children's Coalition for Northeast Louisiana, discusses how intentional, affectionate caregiving supports healthy brain development in infants and toddlers.  

McGilton says that infants and toddlers learn from what they observe and build trust when their [emotional and physical] needs are met. Stages of brain development vary from baby-to-baby; however, all babies respond well to secure environments. 

Early Childhood Experiences Affect Adult Health

Jan 24, 2018
NASA HQ PHOTO / Flickr.com https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/legalcode

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) research has determined that adult behaviors reflect childhood environments. Dr. Paula Zeanah, clinical psychologist at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, brings out statistical information about how adverse experiences may be linked back as far as a mother's pregnancy.

Adverse experiences can be household dysfunction, abuse, or neglect. According to research, 74% of people have faced some adverse experiences. Zeanah says the sobering findings have been the impact of early experiences on later adult health and behavior.