U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Environmental groups have sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in a bid to block construction of a 162-mile-long crude oil pipeline across south Louisiana, including the environmentally fragile Atchafalaya Basin river swamp. 

The federal lawsuit filed Thursday claims the Corps violated the Clean Water Act and other laws when it approved a permit for the Bayou Bridge Pipeline project in December. 

Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners plans to build the pipeline from Lake Charles to St. James Parish. The same company built the controversial Dakota Access pipeline. 

Xavier Lambrecht / Flickr.com https://tinyurl.com/meeq5vf

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisiana Field Office is hosting its 13th annual Physically Challenged Deer Hunt January 20, 2018 at the Columbia Lock and Dam. Eight disabled hunters are to be selected to hunt on the approximately 400 acres in the Columbia Lock and Dam area, located at 580 Lock Office Road, Columbia, LA 71418.

CORY CROWE / KEDM

Before you head out for a day on or near the water, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) encourages you to make sure you have life jackets for everyone and that you wear them. 

house.gov

The Ouachita River may be in trouble due to lack of commercial use.  The ”Low Use” designation  means funds could be scarce for dredging and locks and dams.  The funding relies on a formula  of lock usage and tonnage.

Congressman Ralph Abraham thinks the formula for funding should be based on other factors.

Abraham thinks more commercial river traffic is a great thing.  He thinks the Ouachita River has a bigger impact than commercial traffic alone.

Cory Crowe / KEDM

A doomsday situation could be just around the corner for North Louisiana and South Arkansas.  The Ouachita River could be defunded by the Corp of Engineers because of a lack of barge traffic.

Terry Baugh of the Ouachita Port says, “We are one pen swipe from disaster.”

finchlake2000 / Flickr.com

  The Army Corps of Engineers has agreed to restore 24-hour service to the most important locks on the Ouachita River navigation system after more than two years of lobbying from the Ouachita River Valley Association.

Bill Hobgood, executive director of the association, says 24-hour service will be restored on the Jonesville and Columbia locks, where more than 90 percent of commercial navigation takes place, by late summer or fall. The two uppers locks, Felsenthal and H.K. Thatcher in Arkansas, will continue to operate on two eight-hour shifts each day.